I moved to Vancouver in 1987 shortly after the birth of my son under assignment for KLA Instruments to manage and service all the semiconductor manufacturer accounts in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah.

 

I grew up in a military family that eventually settled in Colorado Springs where I went to High School and joined the Air Force in 1975. In my second year of service I received a very rare Regular Enlistment Appointment to the Air Force Academy where I was in the top of my class before resigning my appointment to return to the enlisted ranks. Then, like now, the economy had crashed and my mother and three siblings were having a difficult time. I could not afford to send money home as a Cadet at the Academy, but my pay as an NCO would allow me to help. I was honorably discharged in 1981 with the rank of Technical Sergeant (TSgt).


After I received my discharge from the Air Force I worked for the Department of Defense for 4 years helping to develop new technologies for gathering time sensitive intelligence. I worked extensively with the SR71 and the U-2/TR-2 Blackbird programs, Americas record setting high speed and high altitude survellance aircraft. I spent the next 25 years working in high technology for the civilian world. I joined a startup company called KLA and helped it become the world leader in semiconductor process control and monitoring. In order to remain here in Vancouver I took a position at Fujitsu followed by Intel working to develop the processes that are essential for the manufacture of the micro chips used in our computers, phones, MP3 players and so on. My last employer was Logitech were I was responsible for monitoring legislation worldwide, and to advise leadership in marketing and engineering on how new laws and regulations would shape the industry and the products that we were developing. There I saw how legislature large and small, could pass laws without regard to the severe financial impacts and confusion that they would cause employers...impacts that cost companies millions of dollars and could end or delay products and put people out of work with no discernible benefit to the public.